Translate
Facebook
X
Instagram
LinkedIn
Youtube

Bidding Opportunities

Thank you for your interest in bidding opportunities with the New Jersey Economic Development Authority.  


Please see the links below to visit the page for the type of bidding opportunity you are interested in.

Business Support Administrative Goods and Services Bidding Opportunities

Below please find a list of IPM Administrative Goods and Services bidding opportunities currently being offered by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority.  Please see the listing below for the opportunity that is of interest to you:

REal Estate Procurement opportunities

Industry Engagement – Requests for Information (RFI)

New Jersey Economic Development Authority
REQUEST FOR INFORMATION
2023-RFI-193 for Identifying Barriers to Obtaining Capital for Art/Culture Entities

1. INTENT/SUMMARY OF SCOPE

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority (“Authority,” “NJEDA”), is an independent

Authority of the State of New Jersey and is seeking information to better understand the challenges

faced by arts and culture businesses, institutions, and entrepreneurs in New Jersey in accessing

capital, especially businesses and institutions that anchor New Jersey’s Main Streets. Access to capital

for arts and culture entities is essential for both for and non-profit entities. A lack of capital access can

impede growth, expansion, daily operations, and survivability of important arts institutions.

Traditionally, the arts and culture sectors have been considered superfluous to economic impact.

When in fact, NJ’s core arts and culture entities directly accounted for $4.6 billion in revenue in 2021

with an additional $18 billion in revenue from indirect impact in other supporting industries like

broadcasting, logistics, and publishing. The combined impact of arts and culture industries account

for 3/5% of NJ’s GDP, as well as 3.1% of the states’ work force.1 In 2022, non-profits specifically,

created $532.3 million in economic stimulus: $338.5 million in spending by arts and culture

organizations, with their audiences spending an additional $193.8 million in event-related

expenditures.2 Arts and culture businesses create job-sustaining revenue for New Jersey Main Streets

and communities with an average arts event attendee spending over $32.68 on restaurants, retail,

and services outside of their arts experience.3 The arts are a growing component of the travel and

tourism industry, New Jersey’s second largest industry.4

Providing access to capital for arts entities is also a core factor to building a “Stronger and Fairer New

Jersey,” especially for the youngest New Jerseyans. In 2019, New Jersey led the nation in becoming

the first state to provide universal access to Arts Education for all public-school students.5 Multiple

studies show that the arts teach students invaluable life and professional skills, preparing them for

the 21st century workplace in which, creativity and integrative thinking, teamwork, self-discipline, and

self-confidence remain essential. Additionally, access to arts education drives higher GPAs,

standardized test scores, and college-going rates, as well as lowering drop-out rates. These academic

benefits are reaped by students across all socioeconomic strata. Arts and Culture anchors New Jersey

communities now and for the future. Arts venues act as a core component of strong and growing

downtowns from internationally famous for-profit arts institutions to those lesser known in small

towns, as well as the hundreds of large and small-scale non-profit arts organizations in all 21 counties

throughout the state. These institutions work to sustain and grow their communities of artists, arts

sector workers, residents, and visitors of all ages.

1 Creative Economy State Profiles – National Assembly of State Arts Agencies/ASAA (nasaa-arts.org).

2 Arts & Economic Prosperity 6 (AEP6) | Local & Regional Findings (americansforthearts.org)

Arts & Economic Prosperity 6: The Economic & Social Impact Study of Nonprofit Arts & Culture Organization &

Their Audiences in New Jersey, October 2023.

3 Americans for the Arts; Arts and Economic Prosperity 6, New Jersey issued 10/27/2023; AEP6 Study Findings

(americansforthearts.org)

4 New Jersey State Council for the Arts.

5 New Jersey Becomes First State to Provide Universal Access to Arts Education; nearly 1.1 Million Students

Actively Participate – Arts Ed NJ.

Governor Murphy and the NJEDA are exploring new and innovative funding solutions to help grow

New Jersey Arts and Culture business and non-profits by addressing barriers to capital. The purpose

of this Request for Information (“RFI”) is to inform EDA of capital access needs of the New Jersey arts

and culture sector. The NJEDA is seeking information and ideas from qualified entities

(“Respondents”), including but not limited to for-profit and non-profit entities, philanthropic partners,

higher education institutions, community development organizations involved in arts-based

placemaking, Chambers of Commerce, arts industry advocacy organizations, state and local

government entities, and other stakeholders with perspectives on structural barriers and disparities

encountered by arts and culture entities in terms of access to capital. The NJEDA also seeks interest

and ideas on solutions to address those obstacles, including but not limited to, existing programs that

address gap financing due to lack of philanthropic capital for non-profit entities. The NJEDA is

interested in receiving comments, questions, recommendations, facts, information, ideas, and

responses that will help the NJEDA better understand the scope and characteristics of access to capital

and other forms of financing available to arts and culture entities.

This Request for Information (RFI) is issued by the New Jersey Economic Development Authority

(“Authority”, “NJEDA”) to seek information from stakeholders with perspectives on the barriers to

obtaining capital faced by the arts and culture community. The NJEDA is interested in receiving

comments, questions, recommendations, facts, information, ideas, and responses that will help the

NJEDA better understand the scope and characteristics of the Arts and Cultural entities of New Jersey

in anticipation of better understanding the challenges and seeking potential solutions. The authority

is interested in identifying creative approaches

2. BACKGROUND

The New Jersey Economic Development Authority serves as the State’s principal agency for driving

equitable economic growth. The Authority is committed to making New Jersey a national model for

inclusive and sustainable economic development by focusing on key strategies to help build strong

and dynamic communities, create good jobs for New Jersey residents and provide pathways to a

stronger and fairer economy. Through partnerships with a diverse range of stakeholders, the

Authority creates and implements initiatives to enhance the economic vitality and quality of life in the

State and strengthen New Jersey’s long-term economic competitiveness.

2023-RFI-193

In The State of Innovation, building a “Stronger and Fairer Economy in New Jersey”, the State’s

comprehensive Economic Development Plan released in October 2018, Governor Murphy reiterated

the importance of thriving downtowns and vibrant cities in New Jersey, which shows a real income

growth of six times that of the rest of the country and acts as a driver for accelerating job and wage

growth for more of our residents. Two of the strategic priorities include “Investing in Communities”

and “Investing in People.” Critical investments in New Jersey communities and people create inclusive

growth across industry in both for-profit and non-profit sectors. Governor Murphy’s plan also

committed to a New Jersey future that supports all the State’s businesses, specifically emphasizing

small business and their importance in building strong, equitable and sustainable urban centers and

downtowns. The Arts & Culture industry is a significant contributor to the overall creative economy

and ecosystem of New Jersey with multipronged benefits. The Arts have proven to be powerful

engines that support the development and growth of communities, as well as their economic viability,

by providing jobs, making downtowns attractive to new businesses and talent, and attracting tourism.

Arts and Culture are a catalyst for making a social and an economic impact in any community.

This RFI focuses on the challenges faced by, and potential solutions for, increasing capital available to

arts and culture entities, and is one of several steps being taken by the Authority and the Murphy

Administration to address the goals of the State’s Economic Development plan. Understanding the

importance of addressing the existing barriers for Arts & Culture entities to create a stronger and

fairer economy, NJEDA will continue to engage and connect with other state entities to determine

additional resources that may be utilized in meeting capital needs for arts entities, including:

• New Jersey State Council on the Arts (“NJSCA”) which provides arts entities with support,

financing, and opportunities for growth across New Jersey while also driving public interest in the

arts, culture, and humanities

• The Department of Community Affairs (“DCA”), which spearheads efforts related to community

revitalization with strategic guidance, financial support and technical assistance to local

governments, community development organizations, businesses and individuals that improve

the quality of life in New Jersey.

• Department of State, New Jersey Cultural Trust, which operates as a public/private partnership

to help ensure a stable and healthy nonprofit cultural industry by providing grants to support

capital projects, endowments and institutional and financial stabilization of arts, history, and

humanities organizations in New Jersey.

3. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA (If applicable)

The RFI is seeking responses from all interested stakeholders. Specifically, this RFI welcomes input

from entities and organizations including:

2023-RFI-193

• Arts Organizations

• Artists and Arts entrepreneurs

• For-profit and non-profit arts entities

• Higher education institutions with arts venues

• Arts industry advocacy organizations

• State and local government or public entities

• Other stakeholders with perspectives on structural barriers and disparities encountered by

arts and culture entities

4. RFI RESPONSE QUESTIONS

In submitting responses to this RFI, respondents are encouraged to answer any questions they consider

relevant and to the best of their ability. Respondents do not need to answer all questions for their

response to be considered. Answers are understood to be preliminary and non-binding. Respondents are

free to go beyond the scope of the questions and/or structure responses as necessary to increase clarity

and efficiency of responses. Respondents should also feel free to submit additional or alternate

information as deemed necessary.

Description of Your Organization:

1. Please provide information on your organization including:

a. The name of your Arts or Cultural-based organization

b. Your name and title

c. Your operating/business location(s), including municipality and county in NJ

d. Your organization type and business structure, e.g., non-profit, municipality, county, LLC,

for-profit arts business entity, sole proprietor?

e. How many years your organization has been in operation?

2. Which best describes your organizational mission? (Check or list all that apply)

a. Presenting organization

b. Exhibition space

c. Studio space

d. Arts Education

e. Professional Development/Training for Arts Community

f. Granting Organization

g. Arts Resource Organization

h. Membership Organization

i. Sales of Art/Arts related services

j. Other; please explain

3. What are your organization’s sources of income? (List all that apply)

a. Grants

b. Local government contributions

2023-RFI-193

c. State government contributions

d. Corporate funding/donations

e. Educational offerings (e.g., fees from classes, workshops, seminars, etc.)

f. Private Donors

g. Sales of goods & services

h. Other; please explain

4. Briefly describe the full scope of your presence in your community and the impact you have.

(Please summarize in no more than 2 paragraphs.)

5. Which best describes the physical space that your organization inhabits/uses? (List all that apply)

a. Rent

b. Own

c. Donated

d. Shared Space (as in Shared Rent with another organization)

e. No Permanent Space for organizational entity

f. Other; please explain

6. Does your organization have a designated Development or Fundraising person or team?

a. If so, how many people are part of that team?

Arts Organizational Challenges in NJ

7. What are the current barriers to accessing funding that your organization is facing? Please

describe.

8. What, if any, barriers has your organization faced in accessing NJEDA funding? Please describe.

9. Are there innovative funding models or philanthropic practices that your organization could

benefit from and that NJEDA should consider in creating an arts-based funding initiative? Please

describe.

10. What is your organization’s strategy for attracting women and people from the BIPOC, LGBTQIA+

communities into positions of leadership within your organization and/or onto your Board?

11. Does your organization have a strategic plan in place? If so, what are the strategic priorities of

that plan? How many years does that strategic plan represent/include? (e.g., 1 year, 5 years, etc.)

12. Does your organization work with collaborative partners? If so, please describe the partnerships,

the goals of the partnerships and in what ways they are beneficial to your organization and

community?

2023-RFI-193

13. Is there an integrated model of creative placemaking that your organization is currently working

toward as part of your strategic plan? If so, please describe/site model and key components.

14. Have you undergone a capital campaign to raise private funding? What have been the challenges

in raising private capital?

15. Would pre-approval of funding from NJEDA for a project facilitate private fundraising?

16. Would professional development or training be helpful to your organization? If so, in what ways?

5. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS (From Respondents to the EDA)

All questions concerning this RFI must be submitted in writing no later than 12:00 PM EST, on Tuesday,

January 23rd, 2024 via e-mail to: ArtsCulture@njeda.gov.

The subject line of the e-mail should state: “QUESTIONS-2023 RFI-193 Capital for Arts & Culture”.

Answers to questions submitted will be publicly posted on the Authority’s website on or about

IT IS THE RESPONDENT’S RESPONSIBILITY TO CHECK THIS URL REGULARLY FOR UPDATES.

6. RESPONSE DETAILS (Info Provided to Respondents Regarding Document Submission)

All RFI responses must be submitted in writing no later than 11:59 PM EST, on Tuesday, February 13th,

2024 via e-mail to: ArtsCulture@njeda.gov.

The subject line of the e-mail should state: “RFI Response-2023-RFI-193 Capital for Arts & Culture”.

7. FOLLOW-UP QUESTIONS (from EDA) / ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Respondents may be asked to provide additional information to allow the Authority to better

understand the responses or services available.

8. PROPRIETARY AND/OR CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION

The Authority reserves the right to copy any information provided by the Respondents. The Authority

reserves the right to use ideas that are provided by Respondents, applicants, stakeholders, or vendors.

By submitting a Response, the submitter represents that such copying or use of information will not

violate any copyrights, licenses, or other agreements with respect to information submitted or

2023-RFI-193

product solutions demonstrated, if applicable. Responses must clearly be marked for any information

the Respondent deems Proprietary and/or Confidential.

9. DISCLAIMER / NO OBLIGATION

This RFI is not a request for qualification/proposal. It may or may not result in further action.

This RFI is issued solely as a means of gathering information regarding the Authority’s desire to

understand the types of barriers to accessing funding faced by the Arts and Culture sector in the

market to meet the Authority’s needs. Interested parties responding to this RFI do so at their own

expense. There will be no monetary compensation from the Authority for the time and effort spent

in preparing the response to this RFI. All expenses incurred are the sole responsibility of the

Respondent.

Should the Authority decide to move forward and issue an RFQ/P or announce a program/product

related to this RFI, Respondents need not have submitted a response to this RFI to be eligible to

respond to the RFP. Should an RFQ/P be issued, responding to this RFI will not affect scoring or

consideration for that process.

The Authority is under no obligation to contact Respondents to this RFI.

10. NEW JERSEY OPEN PUBLIC RECORDS ACT

Respondents should be aware that responses to this RFI are subject to the “New Jersey Open Public

Records Act” (N.J.S.A. 47:1A-1 et seq.), as amended and including all applicable regulations and

policies and applicable case law, including the New Jersey Right-to-Know law. All information

submitted in response to the RFI is considered public information, notwithstanding any disclaimers to

the contrary, except as may be exempted from public disclosure by OPRA and the common law.

Any proprietary and/or confidential information submitted in response to this RFI will be redacted by

the Authority. A person or entity submitting a response to this RFI may designate specific information

as not subject to disclosure pursuant to the exceptions to OPRA found at N.J.S.A. 47:1A-1.1, when

such person or entity has a good faith legal and/or factual basis for such assertion (i.e. information

that may be included in another ongoing public procurement or solicitation). The Authority reserves

the right to make the determination as to what is proprietary or confidential and will advise the person

or entity accordingly. The Authority will not honor any attempt to designate the entirety of a

submission as proprietary, confidential and/or to claim copyright protection for the entire proposal.

In the event of any challenge to the Respondent’s assertion of confidentiality with which the Authority

does not concur, the Respondent shall be solely responsible for defending its designation.

Click here for full PDF

View All Expired RFIs

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (RFEI)

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST (“RFEI”)
New Jersey Green Fund

1.0 Purpose and Intent

To meet New Jersey’s ambitious clean energy goals, the New Jersey Economic Development Authority (“NJEDA”) is issuing a Request for Expressions of Interest (“RFEI”) from project developers, owners, financial institutions, and other relevant parties seeking capital from the NJEDA through the New Jersey Green Fund (“NJGF”), a planned initiative that will be housed within the NJEDA to invest in clean energy projects in the State. Currently contemplated NJGF products include warehousing and aggregation credit facilities; credit enhancements; pre-development and construction financing; and term loans and investments, amongst other structures. The purpose of this RFEI is to help inform the NJGF on desired financial structures and investment products best suited to the needs of the marketplace and help accelerate progress toward the State’s clean energy goals. Additionally, through the responses to the RFEI, the NJEDA can best determine the scale of financing needs across various NJGF products and market sectors. Please note, providing a response to this RFEI is not a formal application for funding nor a binding intent to pursue investment opportunities that may be made available through the NJGF in the future.

NJEDA is seeking expressions of interest from Respondents that identify specific sites, projects, or assets (“project”) within New Jersey that are interested in financial support from the planned NJGF. To be eligible for the anticipated NJGF financial support, assets/projects must be seeking at least $5 million in capital and must be new projects rather than ones seeking refinancing. In particular, NJEDA is looking to support projects in New Jersey that have financial needs that cannot be fully met by existing financial tools available on the private market.

2.0 Background

NJEDA works to expand the State’s economy and increase equitable access to opportunity by supporting high-quality job creation, catalyzing investment, and fostering vibrant, inclusive community development. In order to meet the State’s joint objectives of building a stronger and fairer economy while simultaneously accelerating the transition to a clean energy future, the NJEDA formed a designated Clean Energy department. NJEDA’s Clean Energy department is focused on advancing the growth of clean energy technologies and organizations in the State through various products that support NJEDA’s mission. Currently, NJEDA’s Clean Energy department actively manages several existing programs that finance clean energy investments, including the New Jersey Clean Energy Loans program (NJ CELs), the Offshore Wind Tax Credit program, the New Jersey Zero-Emission Vehicle Incentive Program (NJ ZIP), and the soon-to-be-launched Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) program.

Building on NJEDA’s experience of supporting the growth of clean energy technologies, Governor Murphy and the State legislature allocated seed capital in the FYE ’24 State budget to the New Jersey Green Fund, which is currently being organized within the NJEDA to invest in clean energy projects in the State.  Planned NJGF investments, which may include equity investments, credit enhancements, loans, and other vehicles, will be aimed to facilitate an equitable clean energy transition in New Jersey by attracting private capital to enable the State to reach 100% clean energy by 2035 while also providing measurable benefits to Overburdened Communities, as designated by the New Jersey Environmental Justice Law (N.J.S.A. 13:1D-157).[1] For more information on New Jersey’s Overburdened Communities, including a list of these communities and an associated map, please visit: https://dep.nj.gov/ej/communities/. NJGF will accelerate clean energy deployment in New Jersey by collaborating with public and private investors, foundations, and other non-profit organizations to transform financing markets that will have positive and long-lasting environmental, economic, and social benefits. This work in New Jersey is able to leverage the growing track record and experience of state-level green banks across the United States that have, to date, deployed over $4.2 billion to mobilize more than $10.6 billion in private co-investment, including a strong focus on clean energy in low-income communities.[2] The NJGF represents a transformative opportunity for New Jersey through its introduction of a self-sustaining financial model that would augment the State’s current annual spending and anticipated federal funding to promote and advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, energy storage, and clean transportation. 


[1] N.J.S.A. 13:1D-157

[2] American Green Bank Consortium Annual Industry Report

The planned NJGF will offer financial products and support to stimulate larger private capital investments for, and deployment at scale of, clean energy technologies within New Jersey. Its market-responsive approach to structuring investments will allow the NJGF to be able to design products that address commercial gaps and barriers to clean energy advancement in the state.

Beyond its State allocation, NJEDA is actively pursuing other funding opportunities made available at the federal level, including the Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund’s National Clean Investment Fund competition, to bolster the planned NJGF’s capital base. Additionally, NJEDA is working with the Department of Energy Loan Programs Office and was recently qualified as a State Energy Financing Institution (SEFI) that can unlock low-cost capital available through the federal Title 17 financing program

3.0 NJGF Priority Investment Categories

The planned NJGF through its investments will focus on creating and supporting clean energy opportunities by expanding financing markets, mitigating risk to attract private investment, and increasing availability of capital where it is limited. Minimum project requirements for NJGF investment are outlined in Section 4.0. In particular, NJGF is seeking information on projects that either would likely not occur given the current state of the private markets or might occur in the private markets but would likely (i) involve less favorable tenor, cost, fees, and/or other key transaction terms; (ii) not happen at the market breadth needed to scale the sector; (iii) not have the same level of focus on reaching New Jersey residents in Overburdened Communities; and/or (iv) not happen as expeditiously. Consequently, the NJGF will accelerate an equitable transition to a clean energy economy in the State. That focus will be centered thematically on three key market areas:

3.1 Building Decarbonization and Resiliency

New Jersey has aggressive goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from its building sector, which is the second highest source of emissions in the State.[1]  These include:

  • 100% clean energy by 2035 (Murphy Executive Order 315)[2]
  • Zero-emission heating/cooling systems in 400,000 dwelling units by 2030 (Murphy Executive Order 316)[3] 
  • Zero-emission heating/cooling systems in 20,000 commercial/public spaces by 2030 (Murphy Executive Order 316)[4] 

Given New Jersey’s coastal location in the northeast, enhancing resiliency within the built environment is also critical to managing climate change. Since 1980, the State of New Jersey has been affected by 62 extreme weather events that each have had nationwide cumulative losses exceeding $1 billion.[5] Climate change is expected to continue to threaten New Jersey (and the nation) with increased temperatures, rising sea levels, and more intense rainfall events.[6] These challenges pose risk to buildings in the State that, through its own operating emissions, can continue to exacerbate these threats without increased decarbonization and resiliency efforts.   


[1] NJDEP

[2] Murphy Executive Order #315

[3] Murphy Executive Order #316

[4] Murphy Executive Order #316

[5] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (“NOAA”) National Centers for Environmental Information (“NCEI”)

[6] NJDEP

By providing access to affordable capital, the planned New Jersey Green Fund can empower additional greenhouse gas emissions reductions from the existing and proposed buildings in the State. The State continues to make measured progress towards the goal of reducing overall emissions by 80 percent by 2050 (Global Warming Response Act of 2007)[1], as well as an interim goal of a 50 percent reduction by 2030 (Murphy Executive Order 274)[2]. With an extensive statewide existing building stock and as the nation’s most densely populated state, New Jersey’s capital requirements will continue to be a significant barrier to building sector emissions reductions.[3] In particular, building decarbonization projects for existing buildings typically have longer payback periods and can be more capital intensive than conventional energy efficiency improvements. These challenges are even more burdensome for buildings located in Overburdened Communities that historically have seen less access to capital and often face a backlog of regular building maintenance activities.   


[1] Global Warming Response Act

[2] Murphy Executive Order #274

[3] World Population Review

3.2 Zero-Emission Transportation

The transportation sector is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the State.[1] In addition to targeting 100% clean energy by 2035 (Murphy Executive Order #315)[2], New Jersey’s aggressive goals for greenhouse gas emissions reductions also include having 330,000 light duty zero-emission vehicles on the road by 2025, with 2 million registered by 2035 (EV Act of 2019)[3].


[1] NJDEP

[2] Murphy Executive Order #315

[3] EV Act of 2019

In conjunction with electrification of fleets from polluting combustion vehicles, associated charging stations are required throughout the State to enable convenient and efficient vehicle charging. Zero-emission transportation does not just reduce emissions from the transportation sector. When coupled with managed charging programs or vehicle to grid power connections, zero-emission vehicles can function as battery storage systems and grid assets. 

Ongoing zero-emission vehicle grant and incentive programs available through the NJEDA, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (“NJDEP”), the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (“NJBPU”), and private utilities have helped encourage increased adoption of electric vehicles in New Jersey. However, these programs do not cover the full acquisition costs of vehicles or fully address the scale of transition needed within the timeline of the State’s goals, leaving a funding gap that can be met by financing. In particular, for medium and heavy-duty vehicles, the high costs of vehicles pose challenges to commercial entities looking to transition their fleets to cleaner alternatives. Additionally, conventional financing institutions are often hesitant to finance innovative technologies, such as alternative zero-emission vehicles, that are newer to the marketplace

By providing access to affordable capital, the planned NJGF will accelerate the adoption of zero-emission transportation in the New Jersey market and reduce emissions from the highly polluting transportation sector.

[1] National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (“NOAA”) National Centers for Environmental Information (“NCEI”)

[1] NJDEP

[1] Global Warming Response Act

[1] Murphy Executive Order #274

[1] World Population Review

[1] NJDEP

[1] Murphy Executive Order #315 [1] EV Act of 2019

3.3 Clean Energy Generation and Storage

Increased access to clean distributed power generation with renewable energy systems will strengthen the local and national power system, improve energy security, and help ensure that every community benefits from the clean energy transition.

New Jersey State goals for clean energy production and storage include:

  • 100% clean energy by 2035 (Murphy Executive Order #315)[1]
  • 2 GW of energy storage available by 2030 (Renewable Energy Bill, A3723)[2]
  • 11 GW of offshore wind capacity completed by 2040 (Murphy Executive Order #307)[3]

New Jersey has made progress towards these targets with 1.5 GW of offshore wind projects actively under development[4] and 4.56 GW of solar capacity installed in the State as of September 30, 2023.[5] However, even with these notable achievements, renewable energy only makes up 8.30% of the overall electric power generation in New Jersey as of 2022.[6]  

By providing access to affordable capital, the planned NJGF can empower the development of additional renewable energy capacity and storage and allow the State to meet its clean energy goals. Low-cost financing will be critical for continued renewable energy investment. New Jersey is also particularly focused on developing community solar in the State. Recently, NJBPU raised the annual cap for its community solar program on allowed community solar subscriptions from 150 MW to 225 MW.[7] NJEDA is interested in investing in community solar projects, especially those that benefit Overburdened Communities and are housed on contaminated brownfield sites around the State. 


[1] Murphy Executive Order #315

[2] Renewable Energy Bill, A3723

[3] Murphy Executive Order #307

[4] NJEDA

[5] New Jersey’s Clean Energy Program

[6] NJDEP

[7] NJBPU

4.0 Minimum Project Requirements

Focusing on these three priority investment categories, the NJEDA is seeking project information to help design investment products best suited to accelerate progress toward the State’s clean energy goals and better understand the scale of financing need across various NJGF products and market sectors. Notwithstanding, we would seek interests for other types of projects as well. Projects supported by the planned New Jersey Green Fund will be subject to the following limitations:

  • Assets/projects must be seeking at least $5 million in capital from the NJGF
  • Assets/projects must have an equity contribution of at least 20%, excluding tax equity financing
  • Assets/projects supported by NJGF must be primarily located in the State of New Jersey
  • Assets/projects must be new rather than seeking refinancing
  • Assets/projects must lead to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and/or criteria pollutants in the State; or similarly support New Jersey’s current clean energy and environmental goals
  • The NJGF cannot provide support directly to individual consumers

5.0 RFEI Submission

5.1 Potential Respondents

The planned NJGF is interested in supporting a wide range of entities undertaking clean energy projects. These include conventional organizations such as major renewable energy developers or large real estate developers, but also smaller entities that may be more community focused. NJEDA encourages all interested parties to provide feedback to the RFEI. Potential Respondents to the RFEI may include but are not limited to:

  • Property owners
  • Real estate developers
  • Renewable energy developers and operators
  • Financial institutions
  • Corporations
  • Non-profit organizations
  • Venture and private equity groups
  • Community-based organizations, including those representing Environmental Justice Communities
  • Other private entities

Please note, Respondents can submit multiple proposals to the RFEI, or include reference to multiple projects in one comprehensive proposal.

5.2 Timeline

DateEvent
November 29, 2023Distribution of RFEI
December 15, 2023Deadline for Respondents to submit any questions on the RFEI content or process
January 12, 2024Deadline for Respondents to provide responses to the RFEI

5.3 Required Information for Submission

CategoryPage LimitDescription
Cover Page1-page maximuma. Lead entity’s name b. Primary point of contact information for lead Respondent (including: name, title, address, phone number, email address) c. Similar information for any Co-Respondents/partners
Entity Profile2-pages maximuma. Summary of Respondent’s organizational history and background b. Organizational involvement with and/or commitments to clean energy, including a summary of relevant ongoing or recently completed projects c. Organizational size and/or operating capacity
Project Information5-pages maximuma. Describe the project/asset seeking NJGF support. Include location, project type, specific technologies utilized, overall business model, expected sources of project revenue, and other relevant details to inform the project scope (size, renewable capacity, etc.). b. Explain how the project falls under any of the planned NJGF’s three priority investment categories (building decarbonization and resiliency, zero-emission transportation, or clean energy generation and storage), if applicable. c. Detail any potential benefits to the State, especially in regard to the State’s Overburdened Communities. These benefits should include positive environmental (i.e., projected emissions reductions, local air quality improvements) and economic (i.e., job creation) impacts directly or indirectly resulting from the project.
Capital Requirements and NJGF Investment Support5-pages maximuma. Detail capital requirements expected for each project or total capital needs if Respondent is submitting regarding a portfolio of projects. Include an anticipated schedule for the project, detailing when capital will be needed during various stages of project development. b. Include an explanation for why the Respondent is seeking NJGF support in lieu of or in addition to existing financial tools available on the private market. This explanation may include barriers such as project credit constraints, high cost of capital, long project payback periods, technological risks, complex underwriting requirements, innovative business models, small transaction sizes, etc. c. Indicate what type of investment support you are seeking (e.g., loan, credit enhancement, equity investment, etc.) and when during project development the support would be needed (predevelopment, construction, acquisition, commercial operation date/term loan, etc.). c. Explain how the project/asset is expected to contribute to financial market transformation in terms of e.g., (i) reaching New Jersey residents in Overburdened Communities and/or with credit profiles that are typically deemed to be high risk (e.g., FICO scores below 650); (ii) creating scale; (iii) improving private sector participation; (iv) increasing level of awareness and confidence in the relevant sub-sector or business model; and/or (v) other aspects of market transformation. d. Outline any current or expected internal/external sources of funding (if known) to address financial needs beyond what financial support is being sought via the planned NJGF.

5.4 Submission Process

All RFEI responses must be submitted no later than 5:00 PM ET on January 12, 2024, via email to: NJGFrfei@njeda.gov. The subject line of the email should state: NJGF RFEI Response – [Primary Applicant Name].

Any questions by prospective Respondents concerning this RFEI shall be sent by email to: NJGFrfei@njeda.gov, no later than 5:00 PM ET on December 15, 2023.The subject line of the e-mail should state: NJGF RFEI Questions.

6.0 Post-Submission Process

NJEDA may invite Respondents to provide additional information to allow NJEDA to better understand the information provided in the submittal.NJEDA may also request meetings with some or all of the Respondents to discuss details of responses.

Based on the feedback provided via the RFEI, NJEDA anticipates designing products within the planned NJGF. Future opportunities will be made available for Respondents and other members of the public to apply for NJGF funding regardless of whether they respond to the RFEI. The exact nature of these products will depend on product design, relevant project scope, and relevant source of NJGF funding.  

7.0 New Jersey Open Public Records

Respondents should be aware that responses to this RFEI are subject to the “New Jersey Open Public Records Act” (N.J.S.A. 47:1A-1 et seq.), as amended and including all applicable regulations and policies and applicable case law, including the New Jersey Right-to-Know law. All information submitted in response to the RFEI is considered public information, notwithstanding any disclaimers to the contrary, except as may be exempted from public disclosure by OPRA and the common law.

Any proprietary and/or confidential information submitted in response to this RFEI will be redacted by the NJEDA. A person or entity submitting a response to this RFEI may designate specific information as not subject to disclosure pursuant to the exceptions to OPRA found at N.J.S.A. 47:1A-1.1, when such person or entity has a good faith legal and/or factual basis for such assertion (i.e., information that may be included in another ongoing public procurement or solicitation). The NJEDA reserves the right to make the determination as to what is proprietary or confidential and will advise the person or entity accordingly. The NJEDA will not honor any attempt to designate the entirety of a submission as proprietary, confidential, and/or to claim copyright protection for the entire proposal. In the event of any challenge to the Respondent’s assertion of confidentiality with which the NJEDA does not concur, the Respondent shall be solely responsible for defending its designation.

Click here for full PDF

Fort Monmouth Economic REvitalization Authority (FMERA)
Bidding Opportunities

NOTICE TO INTERESTED BIDDERS

The Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) was created to provide investment, continuity and economic growth to the communities impacted by the federal government’s decision to close Fort Monmouth. FMERA has replaced the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Planning Authority implementing the Reuse and Redevelopment Plan for economic development, growth and planning, with a focus on technology-based industries, for the 1,126 acres of real estate at Fort Monmouth following the base closure in September, 2011. The Fort Monmouth Reuse and Redevelopment Plan forwarded by the dissolved planning authority is a highly collaborative blueprint for action to:

  • Promote, develop, encourage and maintain employment, commerce, economic development, and the public welfare
  • Conserve natural resources
  • Advance the general prosperity and economic welfare of the people in the affected communities and throughout the state

FMERA is given a multitude of tools to revitalize and redevelop the Fort Monmouth area and implement the revitalization plan. Among these are the abilities to undertake redevelopment projects, adopt development and design guidelines and land use regulations in connection with the provision of utilities, streets, roads or other infrastructure required for the implementation of the revitalization plan.

For additional bidding opportunities exclusive to FMERA; please access the FMERA website at www.fortmonmouthnj.com

Forms, Registrations & Certifications

Thank you for your interest in bidding opportunities with the NJEDA (Authority).  

The Authority currently partners with the State of New Jersey and uses their vendor eProcurement Portal Database (NJSTART) to help identify potential vendors. 

When seeking potential bidders for various procurements, the NJEDA will often refer to NJSTART to help identify registered businesses for designated goods and services.  


To ensure your company can be considered on designated bids and request for quotes, we are encouraging vendors to register their company with NJSTART at www.njstart.gov
 
NJSTART is designed to streamline the procurement process and make it more efficient for companies looking to do business with the State. NJSTART provides vendors with the opportunity to create their own vendor files, identify relevant commodity codes, designate Small, Women, Minority, Veteran-Owned Business Certification and upload designated compliance and other applicable documents.  NJSTART will be used by the State of NJ, in addition to other State Agencies and Authorities, to obtain lists of potential bidders.
 
The NJEDA attempts, but does not guarantee, to provide NJSTART registered firms with an email notice of bidding opportunities, related to the commodity codes currently identified in the database. 

 
The NJEDA will continue to post new bidding opportunities on our website at www.njeda.gov/bidding.  

Vendors are encouraged to regularly check our website for new bidding opportunities.  (Please note that NJEDA bidding opportunities will not be posted on NJSTART).
 
Should you need additional information, please contact Theresa Graham at (609) 858-6652 or tgraham@njeda.com
 
Thank you for your interest in doing business with the New Jersey Economic Development Authority.